The Psalter is not simply Israel’s greatest hits on shuffle, it’s more like the first concept album. The Psalter is a carefully constructed collection and in this episode we consider 10 evidences of its intelligent design.

Psalmcast Episode 2 Notes

For an entry-level introduction to reading the Psalter as a book, I recommend O Palmer Robertson’s The Flow of the Psalms.

The ten design features of the Psalter with some examples below:

  1. Prologue (Ps 1-2)
  2. Hallelujah Epilogue (Ps 146-150)
  3. Five Books with doxologies
    1. Book I: Psalms 1-41
    2. Book II: Psalms 42-72
    3. Book III: Psalms 73-89
    4. Book IV: Psalms 90-106
    5. Book V: Psalms 107-150
  4. Five Collections of David
    1. Psalms 1-41
    2. Psalms 51-71 (or 72)
    3. Psalms 101-103
    4. Psalms 108-110
    5. Psalms 138-145
  5. Author Superscriptions
    1. Songs of Korah: Psalms 42-49; Psalms 84-89
    2. Songs of Asaph: Psalms 73-83
  6. Unnamed other collections
    1. Songs of Ascents: Psalms 120-134
    2. “Yahweh Malak:” Psalms 93-100
  7. Chiastic Collections
    1. e.g. Psalms 15-24
  8. Acrostic Psalms
  9. Royal Psalms
  10. Odd features
    1. Elohistic Psalter: Psalms 42-83
    2. Duplicate Psalms (e.g. Psalm 14 = Psalm 53)

Music: 78 Eatonwood Green by Rich Mullins. Copyright: Reunion Records.