My Digital Seminary

Menu Menu

Review: Reading Romans After Supersessionism by Brian Tucker

The New Testament After Supersessionism series continues with its third volume, Reading Romans After Supersessionism by Brian J. Tucker. Tucker has written on 1 Corinthians, social identity, and diversity within the people of God. Perhaps unsurprisingly, then, he believes others have neglected the importance of identity formation in the letter due to an over-emphasis of salvation theology.

 » Read the entire post: Review: Reading Romans After Supersessionism by Brian Tucker  »

New Beyond Reading the Bible Episode

 » Read the entire post: New Beyond Reading the Bible Episode  »

My top books of 2018

Over at Beyond Reading the Bible, Randy McCracken and I list our best reads this year.

 » Read the entire post: My top books of 2018  »

Thoughts on Logos 8

I’m currently in one of the busiest seasons of my life, but I wanted to take some time to highlight the newly released Logos 8 before it isn’t so “newly released!”

 » Read the entire post: Thoughts on Logos 8  »

Review of Psalms 101-150 (Brazos Theological Commentary) by Jason Byassee

Contrary to critical scholarship, the church has long held that the Psalms are the book of Christ. In the introduction to his commentary on Psalms 101-150 in the Brazos Theological Commentary on the Bible, Jason Byassee bemoans the tendency, even found among Christians, to read the Psalms and not find Christ. Rather, with the heart of a preacher, he states that “I read scripture in an effort to discover Christ, and having discovered him, I then try to present him anew to his people” (p. xxi).

 » Read the entire post: Review of Psalms 101-150 (Brazos Theological Commentary) by Jason Byassee  »

Review of New Testament Christological Hymns by Matthew Gordley

There’s a trend in the evangelical church today of reclaiming that which is old. Hymns and liturgy have been making a comeback. In terms of the church’s worship, what could be more ancient than reclaiming the worship of the first believers? Scholars have postulated that the NT contains ancient pre-existing hymns that were sung in early gatherings. However, a recent trend has been to reject the idea of NT “hymns” altogether. In New Testament Christological Hymns, Matthew Gordley—himself an expert in NT “hymn” passages—walks a nuanced balance between the two poles as he reconsiders these intriguing texts.

 » Read the entire post: Review of New Testament Christological Hymns by Matthew Gordley  »