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Category: Messianism (page 1 of 3)

The Ancient Origins of Messiah ben Joseph (Deuteronomy 33)

Leading up to Easter, I thought I’d trace the long-unknown concept found within ancient Judaism of a dying Messiah. In Messiah ben Joseph (review here), David Mitchell seeks to establish that the prominent and ancient Jewish tradition of a suffering, dying and rising Messiah was not a response to the life of Jesus, and certainly not that of Bar Kochba or Josephus. Rather, he is found within the Pentateuch itself. Mitchell’s two-pillar argument is found in deciphering the eschatological blessings of Jacob and Moses on Joseph’s seed in Genesis 49 and Deuteronomy 33. In this post, we will consider the second (see first post).

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The Ancient Origins of Messiah ben Joseph (Genesis 49)

Leading up to Easter, I thought I’d trace the long-unknown concept found within ancient Judaism of a dying Messiah. In Messiah ben Joseph (review here), David Mitchell seeks to establish that the prominent and ancient Jewish tradition of a suffering, dying and rising Messiah was not a response to the life of Jesus, and certainly not that of Bar Kochba or Josephus. Rather, he is found within the Pentateuch itself. Mitchell’s two-pillar argument is found in deciphering the eschatological blessings of Jacob and Moses on Joseph’s seed in Genesis 49 and Deuteronomy 33. In this post, we will consider the first.

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“Who is the Messiah ben Joseph?” An Interview with David Mitchell

Messiah ben JosephDavid Mitchell is a unique fellow. He is a Biblical scholar, expert in the Psalms, and an archaeo-musicologist. His important work on the Psalms, The Message of the Psalter, gave a fascinating defense of an eschatological focus to the Psalms, and is referenced in virtually every major work on the Psalter. Mitchell also recently released a stimulating work devoted to the Songs of Ascent (my review). His newest work is sure to be just as fascinating, as it is devoted to a little-known topic: the Messiah ben Joseph.

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Review: The Messiah and the Psalms by Richard Belcher

Messiah and Psalms-ALTWhen it comes to tracing the Messiah in the Old Testament, the Psalms are key. Psalm 22 dominates the Passion narratives, Psalm 118 is seen in Jesus’ entry to Jerusalem, Psalm 2 appears at key points in Jesus’ life, and Psalm 110 is the most quoted of any OT passage. However, which Psalms are Messianic? And exactly how are they Messianic? Some see Messianic Psalms as fulfilled typologically, others see direct and exclusive predictions of Jesus. Richard Belcher, in The Messiah and the Psalms: Preaching Christ from all the Psalms, presents a different way of reading, where “all the psalms have some relationship to Christ” (p31).

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Is Psalm 89 About the Death of the Messiah?

When I taught a course through the Psalms last Fall, I knew I would need to return to Psalm 89 later. It is a Psalm about Yhwh’s character and His king, it refers to the divine council, it is artfully arranged, and is unusual in reversing the lament->praise formula, resulting in a challenge to God to be faithful to His promises. There is a lot going on here! What’s more, it is mysterious. To whom or what does this Psalm refer? In this post I want to briefly summarize the Psalm, and then investigate two intriguing options with the Psalm’s referent: the demise of the Davidic line in the exile, or the death of the Messiah.

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Psalm 110, Prophecy and Evangelical Scholarship

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