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Tag: Thomas Schreiner (page 1 of 2)

Review: Central Themes in Biblical Theology by Hafemann and House (eds)

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Review: Hebrews (BTCP) by Thomas R. Schreiner

Hebrews Biblical Theology Christian ProclamationAs I sit down to write this review, I can hear the words ringing in my head,another commentary series?” Or maybe, “another review defending the existence of another commentary series?”. The answers to these questions are yes and yes. However, I admit I too have skepticism of my own when I hear of a new commentary series being launched, but in the case of the new Biblical Theology for Christian Proclamation series, and Thomas Schreiner’s flagship Hebrews commentary in particular, I can say that my hesitations were quickly dispelled.

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Schreiner on the Function of the Warnings in Hebrews

Tom SchreinerThe warning passages in Hebrews regularly come up in discussions over whether a believer can lose their salvation. The warning in Hebrews 6 in particular is a common talking point. However, interpretation of these passages throughout the centuries has not been unanimous. How are we to understand these warnings? Thomas Schreiner, author of a recent commentary on Hebrews in the Biblical Theology for Christian Proclamation series from B&H, recently addressed RTS Jackson on this very topic and I found his overview helpfully lucid and his proposed solution compelling.

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Review: Thomas Schreiner, Romans (BECNT)

Schreiner Romans BECNTThomas Schreiner is professor of New Testament Interpretation at Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, pastor of Clifton Baptist church in Louisville, Kentucky, and author of many well-received books. For some, his commentary for Romans will need no introduction as it is over a decade old now and very popular; in that case, I am writing to you by way of reminder (Rom 15:15)! For others, it is my joy to introduce and recommend this work to you.

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The Structure of Romans: A Comparison of Commentaries

I thought it would be interesting to compare the different ways various commentaries structure Paul’s letter to the Romans. I’m only working with the commentaries I have access to, so this is not a comparison of the major commentaries by any means. Secondly, I’m only giving the basic outline; some commentaries have very detailed outlines but I’m just giving the big picture they present, or this post would become unwieldy very quickly! Then I’ll offer a few observations about the similarities and differences.

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Review: The King in His Beauty by Thomas Schreiner

The King in His BeautyOften as we journey through the Bible we run across more unfamiliar passages than we would like to admit. Why is this story here? How is this passage relevant to the story of salvation? Or maybe we have this attitude towards entire books. What purpose does Lamentations, or even Isaiah, serve? Even many older Christians haven’t given this much thought, though we may be good at finding our favourite books, chapters, or verses. Putting the whole Bible together to see where everything fits is both exciting and daunting so we often need help in understanding the story and flow, and this brings me to Thomas Schreiner’s The King in His Beauty: A Biblical Theology of the Old and New Testaments. For Schreiner, “Scripture unfolds the story of the kingdom, and God’s glory is the reason for the story.” (xiii, emphasis italicized in original). Schreiner uses the kingdom as a motif throughout this book, seeing a threefold focus of God’s rule, our role within His kingdom, and creation as the place where His kingship is worked out (xv). Schreiner desires that this will be a book that is “understandable for college students, laypersons, seminary students, and pastors” (x). This is a book for you!

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