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Tag: IVP UK Reviews (page 3 of 4)

Review: Grant Osborne, Romans (IVPNTC)

Grant Osborne RomansGrant Osborne is professor of New Testament at TEDS and a prolific commentator, offering well-received work on Revelation and Matthew, with Mark coming this year in the new Teach the Text series. His commentary for Romans in the IVP New Testament Commentary series (IVPNTC) is also very popular. Having just taught through Romans and worked through Osborne’s commentary, I can see why.

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Paul and Judaism Revisited: Conclusion

Paul and Judaism RevisitedWe’re concluding Preston Sprinkle’s Paul and Judaism Revisited (read the other parts here).

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Paul and Judaism Revisited: Future Judgment by Works?

Paul and Judaism RevisitedWe’re continuing with Preston Sprinkle’s Paul and Judaism Revisited. Read the other parts here. Sprinkle continues to look through the Deuteronomic and Prophetic lenses at five different aspects of salvation that Qumran and Paul had in common (see last post).

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Paul and Judaism Revisited: The Curse of the Law

Paul and Judaism RevisitedWe’re continuing on with Preston Sprinkle’s Paul and Judaism Revisited. Sprinkle begins to look through the Deuteronomic and Prophetic lenses at five different aspects of salvation that Qumran and Paul had in common (see last post). The first is the curse of the Law.

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Paul and Judaism Revisited: Introduction

Paul and Judaism RevisitedDid Paul share the same attitudes and beliefs about salvation with his fellow Jews? Many would say, “of course not, because the Jews held salvation by works and Paul held salvation by grace”. However, most Biblical scholars agree (thanks to E.P. Sanders) that this common view is in fact an unhistorical understanding of first century Judaism; Protestants have been reading Luther and Roman Catholicism back into Paul and Judaism. Instead, Jews did not see themselves as ‘working their way to heaven’. They were, after all, the people of God chosen by grace. Now, God expects obedience in response to His graciousness, but Christians believe this too. So this brings me back to my first question again, did Paul share the same attitudes and beliefs about salvation with his fellow Jews? Some argue for more continuity (e.g. Wright, Dunn) while others argue for more discontinuity (e.g. Gathercole, Westerholm). Much has been written on this subject already as it is a significant factor in the New Perspective on Paul discussion, but if a book came endorsed by Francis Watson, Tom Schreiner, Dan Wallace, Doug Moo and Stephen Westerholm, we ought to pay attention. Preston Sprinkle‘s Paul and Judaism Revisited is that book, and that’s why we’ll be discussing it here over the next few weeks! I hope for these posts to be something of a summary, a review and a discussion starter.

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Review: Dominion and Dynasty by Stephen Dempster

Dominion and Dynasty DempsterIs the Old Testament just a collection of loosely related books? Or is it fair to consider it a ‘book’ in its own right, with discernible plot, characters, and recurring themes tying together the individual ‘books’? In Dominion and Dynasty Stephen Dempster attempts to illustrate the latter, believing that, “the Hebrew Bible, despite being composed of many texts, is not for that reason precluded from being a Text” (21). Seeing the OT canon as a carefully composed Text, Dempster attempts to read it in a literary manner, emphasizing the unity. A unique element in this book is Dempster’s reliance on the Hebrew canonical order, rather than the one we find in our English Bibles today. He holds that this is how the OT would have appeared to Jesus (36), and therefore it is important for us to see it as He did.

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