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Tag: IVP Academic (page 2 of 3)

Review: The New Christian Zionism ed. Gerald McDermott

Like many in my age group, my upbringing was filled with New Year prophecy updates and Left Behind novels. Growing up in the Calvary Chapel family (and still happily in it!), this was my bread and butter. But also like many my age, I have found myself reconsidering some childhood assumptions. In light of the modern Christian shift against supporting a national state and prophetic future for Israel, The New Christian Zionism is an opportunity to reconsider a dominant but former consensus of the past, but with fresh argumentation for a fresh generation.

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Review: Delivered from the Elements of the World by Peter Leithart

delivered from the elements of the worldI must confess. I have procrastinated reviewing Delivered from the Elements of the World. It’s not because it is a dull book; far from it. Rather, more than anything I’ve yet reviewed, I am daunted at the prospect of doing justice to this book’s vastness and creativity. Peter Leithart is known to be a singular, provocative and eloquent thinker, and Delivered from the Elements of the World is surely his magnum opus.

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Review: Adopted into God’s Family by Trevor J. Burke

Adopted into God's FamilyRegeneration. Justification. Sanctification. Glorification. These are all at least recognizable terms even for the theologically-unconcerned Christian. But how often do we think of adoption? Trevor J. Burke recognized that adoption is greatly neglected despite its profusion in Paul’s writings, and Adopted into God’s Family is his attempt to set things right.

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Review: Powers of Darkness by Clinton Arnold

Powers of DarknessHow often do you think about Satan and his allies? Are you quick to see his influence behind unfortunate and wicked events? Or do you prefer to rationalize everything around you as purely natural phenomena? The unfortunate reality is that for “far too long the Western church has given neither sufficient nor serious attention to this topic” (p11) of the Bible’s teaching on Satan and spiritual beings. There is a desperate need for Western Christians to wake up and realize that the powers of darkness are very real, and the Word has much to say about them. Clinton Arnold’s Powers of Darkness: Principalities & Powers in Paul’s Letters aims to fill this gap, by offering a “biblical perspective on demons, principalities and powers, and the nature of the church’s conflict with the powers of evil” (p15). By limiting himself to the letters of Paul, Arnold recognizes the inherent limitations of Powers of Darkness, but sees it as a “first installment” (p15) towards a biblical worldview on the powers.

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How Should we Define “Canon”? The Question of Canon #1

Here begins my review of Michael Kruger’s The Question of Canon! The other parts of the review can be found here.

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Reviewing Michael Kruger’s “The Question of Canon”

The Question of CanonLate last year, Michael Kruger released The Question of Canon, which asserts that the NT canon is not an invention of the church hundreds of years after Christ, but rather a natural and even expected development amongst the very earliest followers of Jesus. The Question of Canon is a fairly short work (252 pages) with a precise focus. Kruger wants to rock the boat a little with those who see the NT canon as merely artificial and late in history; something that happened to the early Christian writings rather than something arising from the character and nature of the writings themselves. Or in other words, were the NT documents called canon (the ‘extrinsic model’) or recognized to be canon (the ‘intrinsic model’)? Kruger doesn’t dismiss the truth or values to the extrinsic model, yet wants to reveal its prominent weaknesses and challenge its exclusivity amongst many scholars. This is much more than a work of apologetics but it certainly has apologetic ramifications.

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