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Review: Reading Philippians After Supersessionism by Christopher Zoccali

Upon turning to Christ, Paul considered his past in Judaism and any other legalistic systems of salvation as “crap” (Phil 3:8). At least, that’s how we have heard this passage taught. But did Paul think this way? Are identity markers, such as Torah-observance and circumcision for Jews, really abolished when one follows Christ? Are Christians a “third race,” neither Jew nor Gentile? Christopher Zoccali’s Reading Philippians After Supersessionism reconsiders these assumptions found in Christian tradition and modern scholarship when it comes to Paul’s letter to the Philippians.

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Psalmcast S02E06: Jesus, the Psalmist

What if the Psalms capture the very words of Jesus addressing his Father?

Vote on the next Psalmcast episode

I am preparing for the next episode, possibly series, on Psalmcast and there’s a day left to vote for what you’d like to hear being covered next. Vote out over at Patreon.

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Psalmcast S02E05: Reading Like Apostles

How did the Apostles see Jesus in the OT? The answer is in Peter’s foundational sermon in Acts 2.

The Geography of Hell in the Teaching of Jesus by Kim Papaioannou

It is a common (mis)understanding that “the Old Testament God” is one of wrath, while “the New Testament God” is one of grace and love. The usual response is that in fact Jesus spoke more about hell than anyone else in scripture. But what exactly did he say about hell? And what did he mean? There are several different words and concepts that he used, and “hell” is an unhelpful word to summarize them all. The Geography of Hell in the Teaching of Jesus is Kim Papaioannou’s published dissertation from Durham that tackles these questions and texts.

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Review: Jewish Messiahs in a Christian Empire

It’s tempting to begin this review by repeating my introduction to David Mitchell’s Messiah Ben Joseph review. The details of Middle Ages Jewish messianic hope are surprising and fascinating. One particularly influential text of the time is Sefer Zerubbabel (“the book of Zerubbabel”), and so Martha Himmelfarb has devoted an entire book—Jewish Messiahs in a Christian Empireto it.

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