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Category: The Gospels (page 1 of 2)

The Geography of Hell in the Teaching of Jesus by Kim Papaioannou

It is a common (mis)understanding that “the Old Testament God” is one of wrath, while “the New Testament God” is one of grace and love. The usual response is that in fact Jesus spoke more about hell than anyone else in scripture. But what exactly did he say about hell? And what did he mean? There are several different words and concepts that he used, and “hell” is an unhelpful word to summarize them all. The Geography of Hell in the Teaching of Jesus is Kim Papaioannou’s published dissertation from Durham that tackles these questions and texts.

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Review: Reading Backwards by Richard Hays

Reading BackwardsRichard Hays is a leading NT scholar, well-known for works such as Echoes of Scripture in the Letters of Paul and The Moral Vision of the New Testament. For some time now, Hays has been at work on a highly-anticipated project regarding the Gospels’ use of the Old Testament through quotation, allusion and echo. Naturally, this is an immense task, and as Hays continues the project he has released Reading Backwards as a “sort of progress report” (ix). So what is Reading Backwards? It is an examination of how the fourfold Gospels use the Old Testament in their representation of Jesus. Basically it is a work on the Christology of the Gospels, focusing on their Old Testament use. Such a work is an ambitious proposal in itself, especially considering the 172-page count. This brevity should not put the reader off, however, as Reading Backwards covers a lot of ground and makes a compelling case for a “high” Christology in each of the four Gospels.

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Greek/English Illustrated Gospel of Mark

Gospel of Mark Illustrated GreekMichael Halcomb and Fredrick Long have produced something quite unique: an illustrated Gospel of Mark in both Greek and English. This looks excellent for those wanting to learn or practice their Greek.

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Why Jesus Wasn’t Wrong about Abiathar (Mark 2:23-28)

From Creation to New CreationJesus’ statements are regularly controversial. This is unsurprising since He is often challenging, divisive, surprising, and always profound. When it comes to Mark 2:23-28, His words are exceptionally controversial because here He appears to be wrong. When recounting the story of David eating the showbread, Jesus refers to Abiathar being the high priest, when in fact it was actually his father Ahimelech (1 Sam 21).

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Miracles and the Kingdom

And getting into a boat he crossed over and came to his own city. And behold, some people brought to him a paralytic, lying on a bed. And when Jesus saw their faith, he said to the paralytic, “Take heart, my son; your sins are forgiven.” And behold, some of the scribes said to themselves, “This man is blaspheming.” But Jesus, knowing their thoughts, said, “Why do you think evil in your hearts? For which is easier, to say, ‘Your sins are forgiven,’ or to say, ‘Rise and walk’? But that you may know that the Son of Man has authority on earth to forgive sins”—he then said to the paralytic—“Rise, pick up your bed and go home.” And he rose and went home. When the crowds saw it, they were afraid, and they glorified God, who had given such authority to men.

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D. A. Carson on the Beatitudes

Sermon on the MountI’ve begun reading D. A. Carson’s small commentary on the Sermon on the Mount to go along with my morning reading through Matthew.

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